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Hoops card guide by Beckett one of best to help collectors

Freelance
Gift guide

LARRY COX

weekendplus@tucsoncitizen.com

Question: I read your column on a regular basis. I collect basketball cards and currently have over 750 issued by Fleer, Tops and Ultra. Is there is guide available so that I can get a better idea of values? – Rob, Tucson

Answer: The 17th edition of the “Official Price Guide for Basketball Cards” by Dr. James Beckett has just been issued by House of Collectibles for $7.99 and is one of the better references. It features more than 50,000 price listings for cards from 1948 to the present from more than 25 brands and manufacturers including Bowman, E-X, Finest, Fleer, Hoops, Skybox, Stadium, Ultra and more. In addition to current values, this user-friendly guide serves up information on the history of baseball cards and how to buy, sell and care for your cards. It is fully illustrated.

E-mail: contactlarrycox@aol.com

The following did not appear in our print edition.

Q: I recently inherited a china pattern from my grandmother. It is Debutante by Homer Laughlin. What can you tell me about it? – Susan, Tucson

A: According to “The Collector’s Encyclopedia of Homer Laughlin China: Reference and Value Guide” by Joanne Jasper (Collector Books, $24.95), your pattern was a spin-off of the Jubilee pattern, originally issued in 1948. It was sold through the Montgomery Ward catalog and is one of the rarest Laughlin patterns.

Q: I have a rather large collection of paper dolls, some cut and some uncut. I would like to find out how much mine are worth. Do you have any suggestions other than monitoring eBay? – Ramona, Oro Valley

A: Marta Krebs is a nationally recognized paper doll expert and might be able to help you. Her address is 3116 Gracefield Road, No. 412, Silver Spring, MD 20904. You might also be interested in subscribing to one of the better quarterlies for collectors, Paper Doll Review, P.O. Box 14, Kingfield, ME 04947.

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